Rebel Moon 1 & 2 movie review1 & 2 movie review – full review

Cast

  • Sofia Boutella as Kora/Arthelais, a former Imperium soldier who rallies warriors from across the galaxy to fight against Motherworld
  • Elizabeth Martinez portrays Kora as a child
  • Djimon Hounsou as Titus, a former general of the Imperium recruited to lead the fight against Motherworld
  • Ed Skrein as Atticus Noble, an admiral and Balisarius’ right-hand man
  • Michiel Huisman as Gunnar, a farmer secretly in love with Kora who joins her in her attempts to defend his homeworld, Veldt
  • Doona Bae as Nemesis, a cyborg swordmaster
  • Ray Fisher as Darrian Bloodaxe, a warrior and Devra’s brother recruited by Kora
  • Charlie Hunnam as Kai, a mercenary and starship pilot hired by Kora
  • Anthony Hopkins as the voice of Jimmy, the last member of a race of mechanical knights[6]
  • Dustin Ceithamer as the body-double on the set of Jimmy
  • Staz Nair as Tarak, a nobleman-turned-blacksmith with the ability to bond with animals of nature
  • Fra Fee as Balisarius, a tyrant and Kora’s adoptive father who seized control of the Motherworld
  • Cleopatra Coleman as Devra Bloodaxe, Darrian’s sister and the leader of a band of insurgents opposing the Motherworld
  • Stuart Martin as Den, a local farmer, hunter and Kora’s fling
  • Ingvar Sigurdsson as Hagen, a friend of Kora who helped her rebuild her life after she abandoned the Imperium
  • Alfonso Herrera as Cassius, Noble’s team warrior[7]
  • Cary Elwes as the King
  • Rhian Rees as the Queen
  • Elise Duffy as Milius,[8] a rebel fighter under Devra’s command.
  • Jena Malone as Harmada, a spider-like humanoid alien
  • Sky Yang as Aris, a young Motherworld soldier who stands up against his comrades’ brutality
  • Charlotte Maggi as Sam, a water girl who warmly welcomes any outsiders that come to her village[9][10]
  • Corey Stoll as Sindri, a village chief on Veldt
  • Stella Grace Fitzgerald as Princess Issa
  • Greg Kriek as Marcus, a Motherworld soldier who arrived on Veldt to demand their harvest
  • Brandon Auret as Faunus, a Motherworld commander, left in charge of the farming village on Veldt
  • Ray Porter as Hickman, a farmer whom Tarak is indebted to
  • Dominic Burgess as Dash Thif, a connected man who came into conflict with Kora and Gunnar in Providence
  • Tony Amendola as King Levitica, an alien king who shelters the Bloodaxes and their rebellion
  • Derek Mears as Simeon, a Hawkshaw working for the Imperium, hunting their enemies for profit.

 Rebel Moon Part 1: – A Child of Fire is a 2023 Sci-Fic/Action Netflix movie, released on 15th December 2023, directed by Zack Synder who is one of the best directors in the world, he has made some masterpieces like DC’s Justice League parts 1 & 2, Batman vs Superman, Man Of Steel, 300, etc. This movie has a 5.6/10 IMBD rating, 57% rotten tomatoes, and 71% Google users like this movie. This movie is also by him but this movie is a mixed-feelings movie when I watched it I came with mixed feelings. Too much was attempted in the movie but too little was achieved in the first part.  And The story and important character development are rushed in the movie.

Some of the major parts of this movie makes too little sense, I can understand how a giant space  a group of 5 6 warriors fight off a massive dreadnought ship and battalions of well armed troops. The twist and betrayal at the end of the movie is good, but I thought the means by which our heroes escape quite preposterous. The scorpion chair robots are very cool but why would you make the paralyzing device same as the key? And how would the farmer, gunner know that? It would have more sense for kai to be playing a deeper, twistier game here.

A village in this movie comes under threat by a powerful enemy and a group of rough-around-the-area-edges heroes are gathered to help villagers to fight back. The actual gathering of heroes is also poorly paced. We get a massively extended scene of Tarak breaking and then riding a space griffon, but then when they find general Titus, it’s one motivational speech.

With a little more time and a stronger script, this could have been a tremendous space opera. Indeed it was merely enjoyable. I didn’t find it half so terrible as the reviews made it sound. The problem with Rebel Moon is that it doesn’t do enough to establish itself as something unique and coherent. Maybe that will change when we have part 2. But I wish Synder come up with some better hooks, some better ways to make this universe, special and distinct and rather than just a hodge-podge of other people’s ideas. And yet, at the same time, it felt mostly very capable as a somewhat darker, edgier, wooden characters and flimsy plot aside. I enjoyed the action and was mostly entertained throughout.

I suppose much of my enjoyment comes here is probably due to the exceptionally low expectations I came into the movie with I was fully expecting it to be a dreadful at every turn, but it was more like a fast-food cheese burger. Not bad, really, just nothing particularly unique and not the type of burger you get on a date. I am Definitely going to watch Part 2 and I am genuinely curious to see what happens. I’ll probably even watch the directors cut when that comes out, which is something I didn’t have the stomach for the Justice League

Overall Rebel Moon is an entertaining but flawed space opera with some great action and cinematography, that would have been better as the first part of an R-rated trilogy hopefully part 2 builds on the opening film’s strength. I would not complain if this become a larger franchise with more room to grow the universe and shape into something more unique.

Rebel Moon – Part Two: The Scargiver is a 2024 Action/Adventure Netflix movie directed by Zack Synder, initially released on 12th April 2024, this movie has a 5.2/10 IMBD Ratings, 50% rotten tomatoes and 60% of Google users liked this film and this movie is the second part of 2023 movie Rebel Moon – Part One: child of fire. The second part is less inventive and worse than the first part.

The last movie set up the Seven Samurai/Magnificent Seven storyline that’s wrapped up in Part 2. A big spaceship filled with space nazis shows up in a tiny, primitive Viking village on a tiny moon in the middle of nowhere and demands their grain. A mysterious women named Kora fights off some of the soldiers and decides to gather a group of heroes to fight the giant imperial army. When these heroes return to the village with the good news telling everyone the threat has passed-only to be told that no, actually the bad guys will be here in five days.

With just five days left Titus rallies the villagers and our heroes helps them gather up all the grain and then the heroes help train the villagers to be special ops forces. That’s three days for farming and two days for target practice.

Still, the bad guys have a dreadnought spaceship capable of leveling entire cities, plus dozens of other spacecraft and hundreds of, if not thousands of, er, stormtroopers. That’s going to be pretty hard for five trained warriors and  a group of villagers who has never fought in a battle before to defeat.

Lots of fighting ensues lots of slow-motion, almost an unbearable amount. It was a ridiculous amount of action sequences. The good guys suffer fewer losses, thanks to plot armor and the good guys emerge victorious.  Before the fighting, we get an exposition dumb/flashback from just about every main character. We learned about Kora past and how she helped assassinate the princess when Regent Balisarius pulled a coup on the royal family and then framed her for the murder. Everybody has some melodramatic tragic backstory, which we learned via flashbacks. For the most part the actors do their best with the wooden dialogue they are given.

Tedious, derivative, and implausible beyond belief, Rebel Moon Part 2 makes Zack Snyder’s first film in this preposterous space opera franchise look great by comparison. If nothing else that’s a remarkable feat. Rebel Moon would have worked better as a series, with time to focus on each character and grow the relationship between them rather than Synder’s relentless overuse of exposition. The story of Kora on the run from her adoptive father for an assassination she wasn’t the only one responsible for is a far more interesting story than this wannabe Seven Samurai nonsense.

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